Category Archives: Short Stories

Short Story: The Visit

A poignant short story about love and life

Awarded 1st Prize – Sports & Cultural Council City of Dublin VEC Short Story Competition, 2010

I’m delighted to have my short story, The Visit, published in the March edition of Live Encounters along with Irish writers Geraldine Mills, Doreen Duffy and Brian Kirk.

Bridie looked out the window of her terraced house. She smiled as she watched Sam pottering around in the garden, stopping to sniff the carnations.

He may not be very talkative but he never moaned at her for the occasional cigarette she enjoyed with her cup of tea. Opening the back door she called out to him. He didn’t even turn his head. It was hard to know whether he was ignoring her or going deaf. She called again and as he walked past her she looked at the sky tutting.

“It would have to rain today, Sam. I’ll be drenched by the time I get to the hospital – like a drowned rat.”

Sam just looked at her.

“Well I won’t be long,” she said, bending to kiss him on the head. She finished fastening the buttons on her shabby coat, tucked her scarf around her collar and pulled on her faded leather gloves. She gave herself a final look in the hall mirror, patted her grey hair into place, glided the end of her pink lipstick across her lips and frowned at the dark circles beneath her brown eyes. Taking an umbrella from the stand, she draped her handbag across her thin frame and pulled the front door closed, giving it a final tug.

Although it was raining she was glad to be outside. A soft day, her parents would have said, back in her native Donegal. The sky was blue, the sun was fighting to appear and there was even a hint of a rainbow.

Bridie opened the door into Cunningham’s Newsagent and queued at the counter. While everyone was talking excitedly about the millions to be won on the lotto this week, her mind wandered, thinking about what she’d cook for dinner later. Maybe as a treat she’d pick up sausages and white pudding and maybe a turnover that she could slice, toast and smother in Kerrygold butter finished off with a steaming mug of tea – something to look forward to. There were three more people in the queue in front of her.

A flash of green caught her eye, as something fell to the floor in front of her.

 

Click here to continue reading my story or click Live Encounters where you can either read or download the full publication for free.

Banner Final Live Encounters Poetry & Writing 2017

Short Story: Paradise Pink

A poignant short story.

Published in the Circle and Square anthology, December, 2015
(available for sale at Easons in The Square, Tallaght.)

It includes work from a number of writers, including Dermot Bolger, Martin Dyar, Mia Gallagher, Mary Guckian, Ferdia McAnna, Paula Meehan, Geraldine Mills, Louise Phillips, Kevin Power, Trish Best, Annette Bryan, Joan Power, Niamh Byrne, Eileen CaseyDoreen Duffy, Gavan Duffy, Brigid Flynn, Marie Gahan, Sue Hassett, James Hyde, Vivienne Kearns, Brian Kirk, Aine Lyons, Mae Newman, Trish Nugent, Tony Shields and Michael J Whelan.

 

‘Lipstick?’ asks Mary, squinting at the label. ‘Paradise pink.’

I purse my mouth and close my eyes, enjoying the familiar sensation of the lipstick as it glides over my dry lips.

‘There you go, LMIRRO002ily, all done,’ says Mary.

That woman is a Godsend. She holds the oval hand-mirror in front of my face. I pull it towards me and bend in closer, pressing my lips together. I still find it hard to believe the white-haired woman looking back is me and I most certainly don’t feel my eighty years. It’s merely a number – an indicator to tell the world how many wars and recessions I’ve lived through.

It’s amazing how a splash of colour across my lips always lifts my spirits, but this has been a particular favourite which I’ve worn for the last fifteen years. A visit to the local shopping centre, for my retirement party, had me returning home with a new look courtesy of the make-up counter in Boots. Maybe it’s time for another visit and an overhaul. Nothing too drastic, mind you, I’m not going back to the smoky eyes and red lips of Lauren Bacall at my age. Besides, I’ve always been more of an Audrey Hepburn – wide-eyed and innocent. Or so I’ve been told.

‘Thanks, Mary, you’ve done a great job, as usual.’

Mary moves behind me, fussing and teasing my hair. Her finger hovers over the hairspray tin. ‘Close your eyes.’

I know the drill. Hiding a smile, I cover my face with my hands, only peeking through when the hissing of the spray finally stops. There’s no fear of Mary leaving anything to chance with these tresses. She knows I love to waltz, but I fear she thinks I love to tango and has visions of me with a rose between my teeth as I strut up and down the room with my dance partner. She will ensure that my hair remains unyielding; like spun sugar sitting atop one of those exquisite deserts in the swanky New York restaurants we frequented all those years ago.

Rat-a-tat-tat. Mary checks her watch, raising her eyebrows, before crossing the room to open the door. ‘That’ll be John, I suppose,’ she murmurs.

There are whispered voices and moments later, a tall, grey-haired man appears in the doorway behind her. I watch as he removes his overcoat, shaking specks of rain onto the linoleum. He is dressed in dark trousers with shiny shoes. A crisp white shirt and paisley tie peep through the neck of his navy jumper.

‘They didn’t forecast that downpour, Lily,’ he says, his brown eyes meeting mine. He crosses the room and kisses me gently on the mouth. My heart hammers in my chest. I gasp and turn away, but not before I see a look of dismay cross his face. What does he expect? Just because he’s a handsome man, it doesn’t mean he can take such liberties; we’ve only just met!

‘Lily, it’s me, love. It’s John,’ he says, as if by telling me his name he thinks he can excuse his shocking behaviour.

He sits in the armchair opposite me and tries to lift my hand, but I pull it away. The sound of his melodic voice soothes me as I practice the two-step in my head, my toes tapping. Suddenly he stops talking and looks deep into my eyes.

‘You look well today, Lily,’ he says, ‘I’ve always loved that colour on you.’

I look down at my dress and smile. ‘It’s my favourite colour,’ I tell him. ‘Periwinkle blue; it matches my eyes, I’ve been told.’ I laugh and pat my hair. ‘I had to make an effort to look extra nice today for my visitors. Did I tell you my son, his wife and their young daughter will visit later. I haven’t yet had the pleasure of meeting my granddaughter. Her name is Mia; my very first grandchild. They’re flying in from . . .’ I look towards Mary, ‘flying from . . .’ I can feel myself getting agitated. I click my fingers, hoping that the words will magically appear. They don’t. ‘You know the place I’m talking about, it sounds like Koala bears.’

Mary hesitates. Usually as sharp as a new pin, it appears she has forgotten too. She looks towards the man beside me. They think I don’t notice his barely imperceptible nod before she answers. As if he is giving her permission to speak.

‘Do you mean Kuala Lumpur?’

‘That’s it,’ I say. “When Sean left America he toured the world before settling there.’ I shift in my chair and turn to look at the man beside me. ‘I don’t mean to be rude, but you should probably leave soon.’ I give him my sweetest smile to take the sting from my words, ‘I’m sure you understand.’

I’m surprised to see his eyes are moist. And strange how I hadn’t noticed earlier what a beautiful shade of hazelnut brown they are; the same shade as Sean’s.

Mary turns off the radio and I glare at her. ‘What are you doing?’ I snap. ‘I always listen to the midday news.’ I didn’t mean to snap. My voice becomes softer, ‘it’s good to know what’s going on in the world.’

‘I just thought that as John was here—‘

‘I’m sure John will understand,’ I say, glaring at him instead. ‘Besides, my visitors will be here soon and I need to get to Mannings Bakery before it closes to pick up a few cream cakes. I must remember to get Sean’s favourite. He loves those gingerbread men. Maybe I should get one for Mia too.’

‘Good idea,’ he says, ‘but I’d like to wait a while. Sit with you. Just for a little longer.’

I suppose he must be lonely. And he’s doing no harm. We were always brought up to be charitable to those in need. I nod. ‘But you’ll have to stop talking while I listen to the headlines. I always listen to—

 

There is still no news for the relatives of the missing Malaysia Airlines flight MH370 missing since Saturday. The plane, along with the 239 people on board, vanished off radar screens while en route from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing. The search continues . . .

 

I can’t breathe. My heart is thundering in my chest, but I can’t breathe. I bend forward, my arms folded across my chest; rocking, rocking, rocking. There is a loud keening noise, like a banshee. It’s blocking out the voice of the newsreader and getting louder.

‘Lily.’

The banshee …

‘Lily!’

I realise…

‘Lily, please. You’ve got to stop!’

…is me.

‘Lily, it’s okay. It’ll be okay,’ the man says, as he kneels before me.

My eyes fall upon my handbag, sitting beside my chair leg. I pick it up and rummage through it, emerging victorious with my lace handkerchief and mobile phone. I dab my eyes, then begin to press the buttons on the phone but my hands are trembling. Soon my entire body begins to shake and I am powerless to stop it; I feel as if I’m losing control.

‘Let me, love,’ he says, presumptuous as ever, it seems. But I allow him to take the phone.

It springs to life. I know he has dialled Sean because the ring tone is longer than normal. I hold my breath. It rings once, twice, three times and then I hear Sean’s voice. I allow my breath to escape. Only it isn’t Sean. Not Sean in the here and now. It’s the Sean in the phone. The Sean that wants me to leave a message and he’ll get right back to me.

I prise the phone from his shaking hands.

‘Sean, it’s me. I just wanted to check that you were alright. I’m looking forward to your visit.’ The tears have started to run down my face and I choke back a sob. ‘I love you, son.’

The phone slips to the floor.

I bend my head and examine the wizened hands sitting in my lap, where they twist a handkerchief round and round.

I am aware of a man and woman. The man has his back to me, his forehead pressed to the window, while his shoulders move up and down. The woman turns the dials on the radio, finally landing on Frank Sinatra. Fly Me to the Moon, bursts into the room.

The man turns from the window and looks straight at me. His forehead furrows and his red-rimmed eyes glaze over as if deep in thought. Suddenly, it is as if his well-worn face deflates like a popped balloon. I look away. I cannot bear to see such sorrow and it would be insensitive of me to ask what has caused it.

‘Would you like me to fix your hair?’

I turns towards the owner of the soft, country lilt and nod. The pretty, young woman smiles and I relax as the soft bristles of the silver handled brush, glide through my hair. Picking up the matching hand-mirror, I watch the soft white tendrils lift and fall around the face of the old woman in its oval frame. I notice she’s wearing my favourite lipstick, Paradise Pink. I must remember to pick up another tube.

Heavy rain begins to fall, drumming against the window pane. The sky is slate grey but the lush green grass glistens outside. The benches, scattered among the myriad of rose bushes, sit empty and desolate.

It will be nice to have a visitor.

The ghost of a smile reflected on the woman’s lips tells me she agrees.

Publication: My Weekly

My Weekly

I’m absolutely delighted to have my short story, Photograph Of A Stranger, published in the latest edition of My Weekly magazine.

As a child, I remember flicking though copies of this magazine as I tried to imitate my mother and grandmother who would spend their free time devouring each article while enjoying a cup of tea. Back then I had no idea that I would eventually have a short story appear between its heartwarming pages and on the very weekend of my silver wedding anniversary too – what timing! My mother rang me first thing this morning from Easons in O’Connell Street to tell me that it had hit the stands and she had already purchased two copies.

Here’s a snippet about My Weekly and I hope that when you pick up your copy you’ll enjoy reading Photograph Of A Stranger as much as I enjoyed writing it.

“My Weekly is a warm and welcoming women’s magazine. Our dedicated team aims to bring you a great mix of engrossing reads plus short snippets every week.

The first issue was published in April 1910 so the magazine celebrated its centenary two years ago. Over the years, the magazine has moved with the times as women’s lives have changed – but we never lose our dedication to bringing the best of life to our readers every week. Come to My Weekly for fun, inspiration and love – not nasty gossip and misery!”

 

Short Story: Redemption

A dark story about crime and punishment

My eyes shoot open and I sit upright in my bunk.  The first thing I feel is the fear, as it bubbles up inside me, leaving acid burning at the back of my throat.

I look around the green walls of my room.  A soothing colour, they say.  Whoever, they are, they know nothing!

Today is Friday, 1 March.

My future will be decided at 9.30am.  It wouldn’t do to be late.Redemption

I run cold water into the stainless steel sink and set up my utensils.  Just like old times!  I even manage a fleeting smile before rinsing my shaving brush in the water and shaking out the residue.  I rub it round and round the creamy, white soap, three times clock-wise, then three times anti-clockwise before I paint my face.  Bending closer, I can barely make out the brown eyes peering back.  I inhale the heady, fresh scent and my mind flutters backwards in time.

With a huge effort I stop myself.  Snatching up the worn, brown plastic comb I pull it savagely through my thin grey hair.  I tug hard, bringing tears to my eyes, trying to flatten the hair over the bald patch which has emerged in recent years.  I massage a dollop of Brylcream through my fingers and press down hard, sculpting the strands into place.

I miss the feel of my stainless steel razor the close shave.  After rinsing away the suds with ice-cold water I rub dry.  I run my battery razor up and down my face, hoping to stem the grey stubble.  I crane forward again and like what I see, not as clean-shaven as with my razor, but needs must.

When the warden turns the keys in the grey, metal door and pushes it open, I am sitting, waiting patiently.

“It’s time Warren, are you ready?”

I nod my head, staring at my shiny shoes.

The other warden, the young one with the smirk, grabs me by the arm and pushes me ahead.  My heart flutters.  I take a deep breath; in through my mouth as I count to four, holding it deep inside me, for the count of seven, then I exhale slowly, for the count of eight.  I repeat three times as we walk along the corridor to that room.

I wonder who will be there this time.  Will it be the same as before or . . .

I’m shoved through the door.  My breath becomes shallow.  My heart quickens.  My mouth is dry and I have trouble swallowing, I feel as if a golf ball is lodged at the back of my throat, cutting off my air supply.

“Sit down Warren,” says a female voice.

I look up to see a slight woman, bird-like in her features, with a halo of grey hair and blue darting eyes.  I remember her.  I’ve seen her face in my dreams often enough.

“You know we only want to talk to you.”  She waves her arm to the right and introduces Mr Spence and Mr Shaw on the other side.  “We’ve met many times Warren, I’m Ms Jackson,” she forces a smile which never reaches her beady, blue eyes.

I nod indifferently, knowing that every word I say will make a difference.  My words, my tone, my actions – everything will be watched and analysed and debated.  My head is pounding.  I want to put my hands over my ears and bury my head between my legs and rock until it all stops.  But I can’t do that!  I take a deep breath; in through my mouth as I count to four, holding it deep inside me, for the count of seven, then I exhale slowly, for the count of eight.  I’m about to repeat it for the second time, but I sense the six eyes across the table waiting expectantly for my answer – but I haven’t heard the question!

I cough into my hand then sit up straight, push my back into the chair and look them in the eyes.

“Sorry, just a little cough I’ve picked up,” I say clearly.  “Would you mind repeating the question?”

The tension leaves the air.

“I just asked if you needed a glass of water before we begin?” said Ms Jackson.

“Very kind of you,” I say, as I take the half-filled plastic cup from across the table, ensuring that it looks accidental as my fingers brush her hand, like a moth to the flame.

Mr Spence clears his throat, pulling at his shirt collar where an expensive tie encases his scrawny neck.  “Warren Davis, we are gathered here today to see if the time you have been incarcerated here at the Tennessee Department of Correction has helped you to see the error of your ways.  We wish to see if you can be released into the population to benefit society.  This is your chance to prove to us that you are no longer a threat . . .”

I tune out; I’ve already heard this speech so many times before.  In my mind, I replace it with my speech.  I’ve practiced it so many times in my cell, pacing up and down, making sure I am pitch perfect – as if my life depends on it.  It does.  I stifle a laugh.  Do they honestly think I’m going to say or do anything to keep me here any longer?  I can feel my lips moving and clamp them shut.  I’ve learned my lesson on that one.  I tune back in to the droning voice, looking Mr Spence directly in the eyes while he talks.  He’s one of those guys that just loves the sound of his own voice.

At last, my time comes to speak.

Taking a deep breath, I sit up straight and begin.

I have most certainly learned my lesson.  I pause, looking at the ground, conciliatory.  “I was a young man, when I made my mistakes, not mature enough to realise the impact it would have on those around me.  I was suffering,” again I pause, this time making eye contact with Ms Jackson, “suffering more than anyone could know.  As you are aware, I was born in this prison and spent my first six months here with my mother – until she was stabbed by another prisoner and died days later.  With no family, so-to-speak, a litany of foster homes followed – where love was withheld from me, I never learned how to behave in society.  But I have learned.  I have found God and he has saved me!  Then, I thought I could take whatever I wanted, pluck it – like Adam taking the apple.  I know now that is wrong.”  I allow my eyes to rest on each of them.  “But God has forgiven me and I have forgiven me!  That was twenty-eight years ago.  I am no longer that Warren.”

The silence in the room is palpable.  My best speech yet!  I feel like punching the air with my fist but I do not.  I sit upright and stare straight ahead.

Ms Jackson nods her head to the warden at the door and I brace myself, holding my breath.

She walks into the room, her head held high.  So like her sister.  I can see a tremor in her neck, the vein bulging, pulsing beneath the collar of her thin, white blouse.  Her black suit jacket and trousers sit well on her thin frame.  Her black high heeled shoes are as shiny and well-cared for as mine.  If only she let her blonde hair grow a little longer, so that it could drape her shoulders.  My mind swirls backwards and I can smell green apples as my fingers caress the silken tresses.

“Ms Dean, we know how hard this is for you, please take a seat and read your statement,” says Mr Shaw.

Beth Dean nods and sits down in the empty chair across the room.  Exactly as I remember her every day of the trial.  She takes a folded page from her large, leather hand-bag.  She cannot prevent the slight tremor of her hand as she bends her head and begins to read:

“Warren Davis is a cold-blooded killer who should never be allowed to leave the Tennessee Department of Correction.  The rape, torture and death of my twin sister Rachel changed the lives of everyone who loved her.  The grief and stress ended our parents’ lives and because of you,” she pauses, looking up, straight into my eyes, with such hatred, that I feel I’ve met a kindred spirit.

The voices in my head get louder.  I clench my fists; hold them by my side, scraping the knuckles of my right hand against the hard plastic chair.

I can feel myself rocking back and forth.  Stop, I scream inside, just hold it together for a few more minutes.  So close.  I bite the inside of my cheek, tasting blood.

“Rachel,” I moan.

I close my eyes.

I know it’s over.

Short Story: Cinderella’s Smile

A humorous love story about active retirement

Listen or download on www.podcasts.ie, July 2013
Published in Senior Times, April/May 2011
Awarded 1st Prize – Bealtaine Short Story SDCC Competition, 2010

The movement of a large, black, hairy spider caught Betty’s eye as she pulled a hairbrush through her auburn tinted hair.  Looking at her watch she muttered under her breath as she made her way downstairs and into the kitchen.  She returned to her bedroom with a glass in her hand, opened her window, grabbed a magazine from her locker then expertly placed the glass over the spider while manoeuvring it onto the magazine where she had laid it flat against the wall.  Balancing all three she crossed to the open window and flicked the spider out onto the extended roof of her kitchen.  He can make his own way back to the garden she thought, as she hurriedly locked the window and remembered to bring the glass down to the kitchen where she gave it an extra vigorous wash.Ballroom Dancers

Moments later she locked the front porch and with her large handbag hoisted on her left shoulder she strode up the road.

“Hi Betty, are you off to school?” shouted her next door neighbour as she flicked her pigtails back from her face.

“Yes Amy, but hopefully I won’t get loads of homework,” chuckled Betty as she smiled at Amy’s mother Joan waiting at the door to welcome her six year old home.

“I’ll knock in for you on Monday for the Ladies Club,” said Joan

“Great, I’m looking forward to it this week.  They’ve a landscape gardener coming in to give us all a few tips.  Sure I’ll see you then for a chat,” said Betty calling back over her shoulder.

Entering the front door of St Jude’s Secondary School she arrived, breathless, at the classroom door just as everyone was going in.  She headed for her usual computer terminal beside her friend Mary, took out her notebook and pen and changed her glasses.

“Well, we have a new member joining us today,” announced Sarah, their tutor, from the top of the class.

Betty looked up and felt a slow heat rising to her face as she slid further into her chair.

“This is Paddy and he’s hoping to learn a little more about computers so that he can keep in touch with his kids in New York and eh . . .”

“And Cavan,” smiled Paddy with a twinkle in his eyes.

As the laughter subsided Sarah pointed out the members of the Active Retirement Computer Group; John, Eoin, Jim, Angela, Mary and finally Betty.

“Paddy, I’ll put you sitting beside Betty today, Tom is at his daughters wedding so he won’t be here and Betty can give you a hand if you’re stuck – sure she’s nearly in the advanced class.  We’ll have you up on Skye and Facebook before you know it!” she said as she pulled the chair out for him.

“Hi,” mumbled Betty barely looking up.  Paddy sat down and turned toward her, then did a double-take.

“Not Betty the best ballroom dancer in Dublin – also known as Cinderella” he laughed.

Betty looked up as Paddy settled his long legs beneath the desk.  He was even more handsome than she’d remembered with his snow white hair cut short and combed neatly to the side.  But it was still those piercing blue eyes, so clear and bright, that made her heart miss a beat.  At my age, I can’t afford to miss a beat, it’s only  the medication I’m on that’s keeping it beating at all.

“I hope I’m not making you uncomfortable, if I am I’ll leave after today, you were here first and I wouldn’t like to . . .”

“No, it’s absolutely fine” she cut across him as she inhaled the fresh scent of Old Spice emanating from him.

“Okay class, let’s continue on from last week where we were attaching photos to your email,” said Sarah while Betty, who normally listened intently while jotting notes for later, thought back to the last time she’d seen Paddy.

It must have been close to two years ago, she thought, when her friend Mary had begged her to go to The Ierne Ballroom for the Valentine’s Day Dance.  Betty, a widow for over twelve years by then, was used to being on her own but Mary was still coming to terms with it all and needed to get out and about.  Reluctantly Betty agreed to go.  Much as she loved the ballroom dancing she attended each Friday afternoon with some of her friends, she didn’t feel the same about going into dances in town where she didn’t really know anyone.

It was on that night that Paddy, who she’d noticed watching her earlier in the night, had asked her to dance.  He reminded her of her husband Tommy the way he swirled her around the dance floor, her feet barely touched the ground all night.  He told her that he was a retired Painter and Decorator – just like her Tommy had been – and he too was widowed, but only the year before when Lily’s weak heart had finally given in.  They had spent most of the night dancing and laughing, enjoying each others company, but then fate had intervened.

Betty had taken a break and was sitting chatting with Mary.  The night had been a great one – neither of them having laughed so much in ages.  Mary recounted her adventure here last time when a guy called Jack had taken her up for every waltz, only to stand on her toes so often that she’d had to bathe her feet for a week to get rid of the blisters.  Taking a sip of her vodka and red Betty, with tears of laughter streaming down her face had started to cough, Mary had patted her on the back and when she’d looked up Mary had started to choke with laughter – Betty’s beautiful white teeth were gone!  Realising what had happened Betty hurriedly buried her head beneath the table in search of them.  Finding the bottom set of dentures she pushed them into her mouth – who cares what’s on the floor, this is an emergency – but she couldn’t find the top set.  In between bursts of laughter they’d searched everywhere to no avail.

“We have to go.  NOW!” mumbled Betty, grabbing Mary’s arm as they grabbed their coats and bags.  They headed out the door and down the steps just as the lights came on behind them.

Hailing a taxi they slumped in laughter into the back seat, tears streaming down their faces.

“Just gone midnight and we’re already on our way home,” said Mary.

“I couldn’t stay there, if anyone saw me I’d die,” mumbled Betty as Mary looked at her friend and tried to stop the laughter erupting again.  “I knew I shouldn’t have worn those new teeth out until I was used to them.”

As the taxi turned onto their road and they both rummaged in their bags for their keys and purses Mary could hold the laughter no longer as she pulled out Betty’s top teeth where they’d landed in the open compartment of her bag!  They’d paid the taxi driver and spent another hour in Betty’s kitchen with a cup of tea while they replayed their evening.

“Well they always say laughter is the best tonic,” said Mary touching her teacup to Betty’s, “better than a gin and tonic any day.”

Betty was drawn back to the present as Paddy stood up and bent across her desk.

“Let me get that for you, Lily used to hate spiders, not that they do any harm, mind you.”

Cupping the spider in his large hands he walked across the classroom and dropped the spider out through the open window.  Sitting down again he swivelled his chair around towards Betty.

“You know, I went back to The Ierne a couple of times after that night hoping I might see you.  I really enjoyed the dancing and the laugh, you miss that most I suppose,” he said wistfully. “Lily wasn’t much of a dancer but we’d go to meet up with everyone.”

“Well you can always come to the ballroom dancing on a Friday in the school hall.  Jim and Angela and Mary all go too,” she smiled.

“You know Betty, I just might do that, anything to see that beautiful smile of yours again,” he grinned.

“Ah, that’d be the Colgate,” whispered Mary while Betty felt a gurgle of laughter, like the Eyjafjallajökull volcano, begin to erupt!

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